Those readers who enjoy cooking and experimenting with different ingredients may like to try these recipes. They all include wild herbs which were already growing in prehistoric times and may well have been used by our ancient ancestors.

Nettle and ground elder pesto with wild garlic

Ingredients

1 bunch of wild herbs (ground elder, nettles and wild garlic)
75 g mixed nuts or sunflower seeds
1 clove of garlic
1 cup of olive oil
2 generous tablespoons of yeast flakes
Juice from half a lemon

Pepper and salt

Method

Roast the nuts or sunflower seeds in a dry frying pan and leave them to cool on a plate.

You could also make the pesto in a pestle and mortar. Place a small quantity of all ingredients in the mortar and grind them fine, then repeat until you have made enough.

Almond-hazelnut balls with shredded dandelions

Ingredients

A handful of dandelion flowers
50 g oak flakes
50 g almonds
5 generous tablespoons of hazelnut spread
A splash of lemon juice
1 – 2 tablespoons of maple syrup
A pinch of cinnamon
A very small pinch of salt

Method

Finely cut the dandelion flowers and set them aside. Grind the oat flakes, but not too much or they’ll turn to flour. Grind the almonds finely.

Put all ingredients, except for the dandelion flowers, in a bowl. Knead to a sticky ball, adding a little extra hazelnut spread if it is not sticky enough. Form into small balls and roll them through the dandelion flowers to coat. Place in the fridge until they are firm enough to hold their shape.

Beet spread with ground ivy

Ingredients

1 raw beetroot
75 g unsalted cashew nuts
1 handful of ground ivy
1 generous tablespoon of coarse mustard
A splash of olive oil
A splash of lemon juice
Pepper and salt

Method

Roast the cashew nuts in a dry frying pan and leave them to cool on a plate. Cut the beetroot and the ground ivy into small pieces.

Put all ingredients into a measuring jug or beaker and blitz with a hand-blender to a puree. Don’t overdo it or it will become too ‘soapy’.

Text                 Leah Groeneweg

Translation     Alun Harvey

Vorig artikelMos door Esther Schlebos
Volgend artikelNew agreement with the Groningen Institute for Archaeology

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